By 2014, 80% of gamified apps will fail to meet biz objectives

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

Gamification is currently being driven by novelty and hype, it noted. Gartner predicts that by 2014, 80 percent of current gamified applications will fail to meet business objectives primarily because of poor design. ?The challenge facing project managers and sponsors responsible for gamification initiatives is the lack of game design talent to apply to gamification projects,? said Brian Burke, research vice president at Gartner. ?Poor game design is one of the key failings of many gamified applications today,? he said. ?The focus is on the obvious game mechanics, such as points, badges and leader boards, rather than the more subtle and more important game design elements, such as balancing competition and collaboration, or defining a meaningful game economy,? Burke said. ?As a result, in many cases, organizations are simply counting points, slapping meaningless badges on activities and creating gamified applications that are simply not engaging for the target audience. Some organizations are already beginning to cast off poorly designed gamified applications.? Gamification is the use of game design and game mechanics to engage a target audience to change behaviors, learn new skills or engage in innovation. The target audience may be customers, employees or the general public, but first and foremost, they are people with needs and desires who will respond to stimuli. It is important to think of the people in these target audiences as “players” in gamified applications. While game mechanics such as points and badges are the hallmarks of gamification, the real challenge is to design player-centric applications that focus on the motivations and rewards that truly engage players more fully. Game mechanics like points, badges and leader boards are simply the tools that implement the underlying engagement models. Gamification describes the use of the same design techniques and game mechanics found in all games, but it applies them in non-game contexts including: customer engagement, employee performance, training and education, innovation management, personal development, sustainability and health. Virtually all areas of business could benefit from gamification as it can help to achieve three broad business objectives:

1) to change behavior; 2) to develop skills; or 3) to enable innovation.

While these objectives are very broad, more opportunities may emerge as the trend matures.]]>

Facebook Comments

Latest Posts

Archives