Only few more tweaks needed for Cybercrime Law IRR

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email

By Tom Noda A few more tweaks and the final draft of the local Cybercrime Law’s Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) is expected to be finished. [caption id="attachment_18065" align="aligncenter" width="620"]DOJ assistant secretary Geronimo Sy (standing) speaks at the podium during public consultation. Beside Sy is Alberto Salvador Jr. of DOST-ICT Office (center) and Tim Rains of Microsoft Trustworthy Computing Group DOJ assistant secretary Geronimo Sy (standing) speaks at the podium during public consultation. Beside Sy is Alberto Salvador Jr. of DOST-ICT Office (center) and Tim Rains of Microsoft Trustworthy Computing Group[/caption] According to DOJ assistant secretary Geronimo Sy, last week?s public consultation meeting on the IRR of the Cybercrime Prevention Act of 2012 will most likely be the final one. It has been the seventh forum since DOJ began its public consultations in April. Conducted at the Manila Peninsula hotel in Makati City on Friday, the forum was meant to clarify and correct some of the Cybercrime Law’s IRR provisions. Representatives from the Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), Department of Science and Technology (DOST), and private sector attended the event. The Cybercrime Law defines and penalizes crimes related to information and communications technology (ICT). It will be implemented after the publication of its finalized IRR. The issues raised during the forum were mostly about the “correct functions” of DOJ’s Office of Cybercrime (OOC), the Cybercrime Investigation and Coordinating Center (CICC) under the Office of The President, and law enforcement agencies like the Anti-Cybercrime Group of the Philippine National Police (PNP), and the Cybercrime Division of the National Bureau of Investigation (NBI). Angel Averia, Jr., president of the Philippine Computer Emergency Response Team (PHCERT), argued that the DOJ’s OOC can designate special prosecutors to handle cybercrime cases but not investigators. “Does it exceed the law? Designation of prosecutors is okay but not investigators,” Averia said. “Law enforcers have the exclusive right for that.” Averia also asked how the CICC, aside from government and academe, will nominate or choose its members from the private sector. Other forum participants, especially lawyers, also highlighted the importance of missing words and punctuations in some of the IRR’s provisions, adding that even a single, misplaced comma can have an effect on a case. Meanwhile, Sy said that even after the last forum, DOJ is expecting and will still be open about receiving comments, suggestions, and positions papers for the IRR’s improvement. Sy shared the OOC has lately been receiving an average of one reported cybercrime case daily. Signed and approved by President Aquino last June 2012, the Cybercrime Law became controversial primarily because of its online libel provisions. It was recently ruled as constitutional by the Supreme Court. ]]>

Facebook Comments

Latest Posts

Archives