Tuesday, May 28, 2024

Gov?t issues warning anew on online health scams

Any health supplement that is ?too good to be true? could be a scam, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned anew as a number of so-called health products continue to be sold in the Internet.

The FDA (formerly known as BFAD or Bureau of Food and Drugs) building in Muntinlupa City. Photo credit: wikimapia.org
The FDA (formerly known as BFAD or Bureau of Food and Drugs) building in Muntinlupa City. Photo credit: wikimapia.org

The FDA, in a statement, said that there is no such thing as cure-all health supplements that promise quick and easy remedies for serious health conditions.

?The truth [is that] dietary supplements are merely food products indeed to be taken only to support the nutritional needs of the body,? the FDA noted.

?(They are) not meant to have any therapeutic effect nor to replace prescribed medications,? it further stated.

Such products, the FDA explained, can be more than just ineffective. In some cases, they may actually affect an individual?s health.

?Be wary of these advertisements and marketing schemes of unscrupulous individuals whose main concern is profit,? the FDA said.

?Health/dietary supplements are usually promoted by people who have no medical qualifications but exploit hopes for improved health,? it added.

Most common products sold online with false claims include weight loss products and whitening or beauty products. ?Always remember that there is no substitute for proper diet and regular exercise,? the FDA explained.

The government agency said it is illegal for vendors to sell health supplements if they do not have a valid License To Pperate (LTO) from the FDA and without a licensed pharmacist. Consumers can verify a seller?s LTO at the FDA website. — PNA

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